Stages expands Dash computer line with color GPS units

Stages  new Dash computers offer navigation and interval infographics on a screen the company calls EverBriteStages Cycling launched two new computers, the Dash L50 and Dash M50, which will offer GPS mapping plus detailed power-training graphics on bright color screens. The £210 / $249 Dash M50 and £275 / $349 Dash L50 will be available this fall.

Stages Dash M50 highlights

  • auto-population of workouts from Stages Link
  • color “EverBrite” screen
  • claimed 15hr battery life
  • 73x53mm body, 320×240 display
  • 65g
  • portrait or landscape orientation with stock aluminum mount
Stages used Open Street Maps as the basis for its navigation
Stages used Open Street Maps as the basis for its navigation

Stages Dash L50 highlights

  • auto-population of workouts from Stages Link
  • color “EverBrite” screen
  • claimed 18hr battery life
  • 85x58mm body, 400×240 display
  • 100g
  • portrait or landscape orientation with stock aluminum mount

Still power-centric, but with GPS mapping plus color display

Stages Cycling began six years ago with single-sided, crank-based power meters. The company recently added its Dash computer to the mix with a myopic focus on training. The black-and-white Dash — still available as the L10 for £135 / $145 — features a highly customizable layout and deep layers of power-centric analysis and interval execution. The Dash was best for riders looking to specifically follow a power-based training plan to the T.

The new Dash L50 and M50 build on that power-centric training focus, but in more user-friendly packages with color infographics. Many of Stages Cycling’s founders come from the indoor cycling world, where power-based training is common but often communicated just in colors on a circular dial, not in watts. The new Dash computers offer both, plus the frequently used bar graphs for interval visualization.

The Dash L50 has a claimed battery life of 18 hours
The Dash L50 has a claimed battery life of 18 hours

The new Dash comes with a variety of stock workouts on the unit. The computers also track a rider’s 90-day personal best power for a variety of durations, and adapts the workouts to that. (You can turn that auto feature off and set your training zones manually, too, if you like.)

“The idea is that, you can take it out of the box, and never

sync it to our training software Stages Link or pair to your phone, and you can just start riding with power or HR, do workouts, and it learns,” said Stages senior vice president Pat Warner.

Notably, the new Dash units also have GPS mapping for the first time.

Also, the Stages Link app has been significantly upgraded, from its original function as a way to just upload files to a robust analysis tool more along the lines of a TrainingPeaks app.

As before, the Dash computers work with power meters and heart rate monitors from any brand on ANT+ and Bluetooth.

The new Dash computers are configurable for every screen, including the navigation and the workout presentations
The new Dash computers are configurable for every screen, including the navigation and the workout presentations

Stages is calling its new screen EverBrite, which Stages claims to be easier to read in all conditions than a Garmin Edge or Wahoo Elemnt screen. The backlight on EverBrite does not turn off, but requires less power than other GPS computers, according to Stages.

“We never intended to go after Garmin. We wanted to focus on power-training workout functionality,” Warner said. “Since the release of the Dash, we have listened to our customers, and have added what they have asked for. We haven’t taken anything away – we still believe in power training – we have just added to it.”

Both the L50 and the M50 support GPX, TCX and FIT routes. They both work on ANT+ and Bluetooth, but not wifi.

 Both come with low-profile aluminum mounts that put the Dash right in front of the stem.

Like the original Dash, the Dash M50 can be used in portrait or landscape
Like the original Dash, the Dash M50 can be used in portrait or landscape

Ben has been writing about bikes since 2000, covering everything from the Tour de France to Asian manufacturing to kids’ bikes. The former editor-in-chief of VeloNews, he began racing in college while getting a journalism degree at the University of New Mexico. Based in the cycling-crazed city of Boulder, Colorado, with his wife and two kids, Ben enjoys riding most every day.
  • Discipline: Road (paved or otherwise), cyclocross and sometimes mountain. His tri-curious phase seems to have passed, thankfully
  • Preferred Terrain: Quiet mountain roads leading to places unknown
  • Current Bikes: Scott Foil Team Issue, Specialized S-Works Tarmac, Priority Eight city bike… and a constant rotation of test bikes
  • Dream Bike: A BMC Teammachine SLR01 with disc brakes and clearance for 30mm tires (doesn’t yet exist)
  • Beer of Choice: Saison Dupont
  • Location: Boulder, CO, USA

source:-.bikeradar.