LG to Make iPhone Batteries Next Year: Report

LG to Make iPhone Batteries Next Year: Report

South Korea’s LG Chem is slated to exclusively provide batteries for Apple’s iPhone 9 which is likely to be launched next year, a Korean newspaper reported on Friday.

LG Chem has invested hundreds of billions of won in a dedicated line for the purpose and will produce “L-shaped” batteries for next year’s iPhone, the Korea Economic Daily reported citing an unnamed chemical industry source.

A spokesman for LG Chem said it does not respond to inquiries about client companies. Apple could not be immediately reached for comment.

LG Chem shares rose 3.7 percent in morning trade to their highest level since April 2016. They later pared agains to be up 0.5 percent.

LG Electronics this week launched a new smartphone, the Q8. A new entrant into the Q-Series of smartphones that is meant to offer premium features at a competitive price, the LG Q8 is essentially a smaller version of the LG V20 that was launched last year. Apart from a dual rear camera setup, it also sports a secondary always-on display. It is powered by a Snapdragon 820 SoC that’s coupled with 4GB of RAM.

The LG Q8 was launched in Italy, however, there are no details on availability or price for now. The smartphone is also water and dust resistant, with an IP67 rating that allows immersion in up to 1.5 metres of water for up to 30 minutes. It also features 32-bit Quad DAC support, and an infrared emitter.

 

[“source-gadgets.ndtv”]

LG Q8 Launched as Smaller V20 Variant With 5.2-Inch QHD Display, Snapdragon 820 SoC

LG Q8 Launched as Smaller V20 Variant With 5.2-Inch QHD Display, Snapdragon 820 SoC

LG, shortly after introducing the new Q-series smartphones, has now unveiled the Q8. The all-new LG smartphone has been launched in Italy. Unfortunately, there’s no word when the LG Q8 will go on sale and the price tag it will sport. Additionally, there’s no word whether the smartphone will be made available outside Italy or if it will be rebranded for the international market.

The all-new LG Q8 for all means and purposes is a mini variant of the LG V20 with a smaller screen. One of the highlights of the LG Q8 is it sports a secondary screen.

The LG Q8 features a 5.2-inch QHD (1440×2560 pixels) IPS LCD display with Corning Gorilla Glass 4 protection. It sports a pixel density of 554ppi. There’s also an “always-on” secondary display with a screen resolution of 160×1040 pixels. It runs on the company’s LG UX 5.0 based on Android 7.0 Nougat. To recall, the LG V20 was the first phone to ship with Android 7.0 Nougat out-of-the-box last year.

Under the hood, the phone is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 SoC coupled with 4GB of LPDDR4 RAM. There’s 32GB inbuilt storage that’s expandable via microSD card.

The LG Q8 sports a dual camera setup at the back with a 13-megapixel sensor with f/1.8 aperture and an 8-megapixel sensor with f/2.4 aperture. There’s also a 5-megapixel front camera with f/1.9 aperture. The phone is backed by a 3000mAh battery. Connectivity options include Wi-Fi 802.11a/b/g/n/ac dual-band, Bluetooth v4.2, and USB Type-C. LG Q8 comes with IP67 certification making it water resistant up to 1.5 metres for 30 minutes. There’s a fingerprint sensor at the back placed just below the dual camera setup. The phone also packs an infrared emitter. Much like other LG high-end devices, the LG Q8 also comes with 32-bit quad DAC support. It measures 149×71.9x8mm and weighs 146 grams.

 

[“source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Nokia 2 Budget Android Smartphone Leaked in Image Comparing It With Nokia 3

Nokia 2 Budget Android Smartphone Leaked in Image Comparing It With Nokia 3

HMD Global, the custodian of Nokia mobile brand, has been rumoured to be working on few Android-based smartphones that have been leaked in recent past. Now, a new leaked image from China claims to show the entry-level Nokia 2 Android smartphone being compared alongside the Nokia 3.

The new leaked image has been posted by a tipster on Chinese website, Baidu, and purportedly shows the yet-to-be-announced Nokia 2. The alleged Nokia 2 could be the company’s cheapest offering this year which means that the phone may be priced lower than the Nokia 3, which is the cheapest Android smartphone in HMD Global’s portfolio. It’s worth pointing out that the tipster has allegedly used a schematic of Nokia 3 to compare it alongside the alleged Nokia 2.

The Chinese tipster also claims that the Nokia 2 may be powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 210 MSM8909 processor. Much like the Nokia 3, the alleged Nokia 2 also doesn’t feature a fingerprint scanner. Additionally, the Nokia 2 seems to feature a similar 5-inch display as it looks to match the screen space of the Nokia 3.

Further, the tipster also claims that the budget Nokia 2 may look like now dead Lumia 620. Looking at the leaked image, it gives an impression that the alleged Nokia 2 may sport rounded edges much like the Lumia 620.

Unfortunately, there’s no word on the launch of the Nokia 2 as of now but we can expect to hear more about the phone in the coming weeks. The Baidu listing was first spotted by DroidHolic.

Apart from the entry-level Nokia 2, HMD Global is expected to launch the Nokia 8 as well as the long-rumoured Nokia 9 smartphone later this year.

Recently, the Nokia 8 flagship smartphone was spotted on the official Chinese site hinting at an imminent launch.

 

[“source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Windows 10 is SHARING your files with the internet – here’s how you can stop it

Windows 10 has a default setting which shares your files with the internet

Windows 10 has a default setting which shares your files with the internet
Windows 10 has a default setting that shares files on your PC with other PCs on the internet – and it all happens when you update the Microsoft software.

As part of the Windows 10 update process, Microsoft have created a system called Windows Update Delivery Optimization.

When this is on, Windows 10 will send updates from your computer to other PCs on your local network or on the internet.

The process, which was outlined on an official Microsoft website, has two different settings.

Setting one allows Windows 10 to share files with other computers on your local network.

However setting two allows Windows 10 to share files with other computers on your local network AND other computers on the internet, according to Techrepublic.

The second setting is the default for every version of Windows 10 – apart from Windows 10 Enterprise and Windows 10 Education.

The Windows Update Delivery Optimization is also active when you purchase and downloaded any apps from the Microsoft Store.

Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

If you’d rather files from your Windows 10 device aren’t shared there are ways to turn the feature off completely or tweak it.

If you’d like to turn it off, you firstly have to open the Windows Update Settings Screen. This can be done by typing it into Cortana.

Then, click or tap the Advanced Options link on this page.

After that, select Choose How Updates Are Delivered and on this screen you can change the default settings for Windows Update Delivery Optimization.

You can turn it off entirely or you can select the local network option.

Here’s what you should do after a Windows 10 upgrade

On the Microsoft website for the Windows Update Delivery Optimization, they say the setting does not download or send a user’s personal content.

They say the feature was created to provide updates and apps quicker if a Windows 10 user has an unreliable internet connection.

Microsoft said: “Delivery Optimization doesn’t access your personal files or folders or change any files on your PC.”

Express.co.uk have previously revealed that despite the free Windows 10 upgrade period ending last year you may still be able to download Microsoft’s latest OS at no extra cost.

The Windows 10 setting which by default shares files can be turned offMICROSOFT

The Windows 10 setting which by default shares files can be turned off

The Windows 10 free download offer ended last July, but PC owners can still upgrade by following a few simple steps.

Users who have a properly licensed and activated version of Windows 7 and 8.1  can upgrade by go to the Download Windows 10 webpage and click the ‘Download tool now’ button.

After that has downloaded, people need to run the Media Creation Tool.

You can then choose ‘Upgrade this PC now’ if you have downloaded the Media Creation Tool onto the PC you want to upgrade and if you’re only upgrading one machine.

[“Source-express”]

Google’s Brilliant iPhone App Sucks On Android

Google’s simple yet impressive iOS app, Motion Stills, is finally available for Android users, but it’s a very different beast from the original version.

Google

Previously an iOS exclusive, Google’s Motion Stills is now available for Android.

Designed specifically to work with Apple’s Live Photos, Motion Stills for iOS works with the short motion sequences automatically captured alongside each photo taken with the default iOS camera app. It then applies clever digital image stabilisation to produce smooth animated GIFs and videos which can then be shared separately from the original image. The results are often a big improvement over the originals.

The new Android version of the app produces similarly impressive automatically stabilised clips but, because Live Photos are exclusive to iOS, it is forced to function rather differently.

The Android version of Motion Stills instead requires the user to shoot a short video sequence from within the app which then automatically applies Google’s stabilisation magic while recording.

Unfortunately for fans of the iOS version, the user experience on Android is very different and in many ways inferior. A big part of the fun of the iOS original is using the app to browse through all the Live Photos already existing on your phone which had been incidentally captured while shooting stills. Many of these may have otherwise been forgotten or ignored and Motion Stills is therefore a way of finding lost gems within your camera roll.

This experience is missing entirely from the Android version as all Motion Stills must be created within the app itself. You can’t just shoot video with the default camera app and stabilise them later with Motion Stills.

This means you have to decide to create a Motion Still at the time the image is taken. Similarly, while the resulting GIFs and videos can be easily exported and shared online, they don’t automatically appear in your phone’s gallery. You have to export them one at a time.

One new inclusion on the Android version is the ‘Fast Forward’ feature which provides the ability to ‘compress’ up to a minute of recorded video into a short, stabilised clip that runs at up to 8x normal speed for a time lapse effect.

Although it creates great-looking stabilised video clips, the Android version of Motion Still is far less useful than the original. There’s no getting around the lack of Live Photos in Android, but tighter integration with the Android camera would be a big improvement.

You can download Motion Stills  for Android on Google Play, or the iOS version from the app store.

[“Source-.forbes”]

Go Update Your iPhone Or iPad Right Now

Image result for Go Update Your iPhone Or iPad Right Now

If you use WiFi on your iPhone or iPad, and you probably do, you’ll want to head to the Updates section as soon as you can to update its software before you start your weekend. There are a number of security patches, the most important of which fixes a flaw in the WiFi chip that can let someone standing near you execute code on your phone.

Since most of us prefer not to have our phones taken over by hackers, it’s a good idea to install Apple’s latest security update as soon as you’re on a fast, reliable, and private WiFi connection. If you won’t be home for a while, a stopgap fix would be to turn off your device’s WiFi when you’re out in public.

Updating the software, if you’ve never done it, isn’t scary. (Make sure to back your phone or tablet up to a computer or to iCloud before doing this.)

• Go to the “Settings” app on your phone’s home screen, and tap on that.

• Scroll down to “General,” and tap on that.

• Finally, tap on the “Software Update” option.

Google patched the same flaw, which the discoverer calls Broadpwn, for affected Android devices at the beginning of July, so Android users can feel suitably smug.

[“Source-consumerist”]

Turn your Mac or PC into a cheap and easy Apple TV

If you’ve got an old iMac lying around — or any Mac or PC for that matter — you can repurpose it as a cheap alternative to an Apple TV so you can stream your iPhone or Android phone to its larger display.

All you need is the Reflector 2 app, which is much cheaper than going out and buying an Apple TV. With the app, you can quickly connect to your computer’s display for viewing photos or videos or just mirroring your phone’s display.

I used the Mac app, but there are versions of Reflector 2 for Windows, Android and Amazon Fire TV. The app works with Google Cast as well as Apple AirPlay.

Reflector 2 setup

Download and install the Reflector 2 app. It costs $15 (about £12 or AU$19) and you can try before you buy with a free, seven-day trial. You don’t need to install anything extra on your iPhone.

airplay
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET

With the Reflector 2 running on your computer and it and your iPhone connected to the same Wi-Fi network, you simply need to swipe up on your iPhone for the Control Center and then find the computer running Reflector 2 in the AirPlay menu. The app mirrors your iPhone’s display but is smart enough to switch to a larger, resizable window when you are viewing photos or watching a video.

reflector-2-video-player
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET

On a Mac, Reflector 2 adds an icon to the menu bar where you can hit an eject button to disconnect. (You can also disconnect using the AirPlay menu in the Control Center on your iPhone.) The menu-bar window also provides buttons to record your display and stream to YouTube Live. For screen mirroring, you can choose an iPhone frame to add a little polish.In Reflector 2’s Preferences, you can choose a default resolution for AirPlay and password protect your connection on the Connection tab. On the General tab, I turned off the setting for Show Client Name, which removes the header at the top of the Reflector 2 window that features the name of the device to which it is connected.

[Source:-CNET]

This week’s highs and lows in PC gaming

Joe Donnelly: Terry loves PC Gamer

This week I interviewed ex-NFL linebacker-turned-Hollywood actor-turned-PC gaming enthusiast Terry Crews. Despite this being relatively exciting in and of itself, Crews’ positivity not only for building desktops but towards life in general is infectious, and it was a pleasure hearing tales of he and his son mucking around with VR hardware, and playing Battlefield 1 alongside Snoop Dogg and Jamie Foxx.

I also appreciated Crews dispelling some of the enduring and misconstrued stereotypes tied to our hobby. Hearing him compare gaming to acting, painting and furniture making was nice. Oh, and he also said this: “I’m a big fan of PC Gamer, you guys are rocking.” Am I gushing here? Probably. Read the interview in full this-a-way and make up your own mind.

Andy Kelly: Wolf at the door

This week I played an hour of Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus. But while I can’t talk about that right now, I can talk about what’s been shown of the game so far, mainly at this year’s E3. Specifically, I love what the developer is calling ‘Germericana’. A large chunk of the new game will be set in a Nazi-occupied United States, which makes for some striking imagery. MachineGames has taken idyllic scenes of American life in the 1960s and imagined how the Nazis would have perverted them for their own propaganda needs. There’s something compelling about seeing Main Street, U.S.A. draped in swastikas.

Blazkowicz is, of course, an American himself, which should make for a particularly bitter homecoming. But as if he didn’t love killin’ Nazis enough, seeing them stomping all over his beloved country will make him even more eager to decimate the Führer’s army. Bringing Wolfenstein to the United States for the first time is an inspired idea, and has given the writers even more scope to craft a wild, outrageous alternate history. What I’ve seen is even more out there than the previous game. You can read my full thoughts, and an interview with creative director Jens Matthies, here next Thursday.

Chris Livingston: Windows Ninety-Die

I took some time off, during which I didn’t play any games at all—when I’m not working I like to expand my horizons by napping between Netflix binge sessions—and since I’ve been back I’ve only had time to play a single game. Luckily, it’s a cool one: Kingsway, from developer Andrew Morrish and published by Adult Swim. It’s a roguelike fantasy RPG as realized by a Windows 95-like operating system.

Everything takes place in various windows and panes on your virtual desktop, from exploring to looting to tense and complex boss fights, and it all works wonderfully well. Quests arrive as emails, status effects appear in your taskbar, and there’s lots of clicking, rearranging, and minimizing. In other words, if you’ve ever used an operating system, you already know how to play: no tutorial needed. It’s only $10 on Steam—well worth it, I think.

James Davenport: Hearty Oats

As a college freshman, Neill Blomkamp’s District 9 blew my mind. The special effects work still stands out among the blinding CGI most blockbusters choke on today. His later films, Chappie and Elysium, were horribly written, but still a lot of fun to look at, so I stopped worshipping at Blomkamp’s temple for a while. Now, he’s back with Oats Studios Volume 1, a collection of free short films. They’re not games, sure, but they’re available on Steam which is enough of a qualification for me.

The big three—Firebase, Rakka, and Zygote—clock in at about 30 minutes long, and while they’re not going to win any awards for storytelling, each features some kind grotesque monster as the villain. The visual effects and design are unlike anything I’ve seen in modern popular film, so if you’re into movie monsters, I definitely recommend putting aside an hour or two to watch them all. Zygote feels like an especially easy recommendation for videogame people, starring a creature that feels like a creative, natural combination of The Thing and Dead Space.

Tim Clark: There’s no need to shout 

Sometimes writing nice stuff about The Elder Scrolls: Legends feels like flipping coins into a wishing well. You want someone to be listening, but fear just getting a wet plop in return. I’m going to continue regardless, because I think the game is in great shape since the release of the Heroes of Skyrim set and the introduction of Twitch Drop giveaways. Skyrim’s Dragons, Shouts and Werewolves are super flavourful, and my beloved Midrange Archer and Sorcerer decks are both in good shape in this meta. With my other half away, I’ve been staying up late just to hop on my daily quest as soon as it refreshes.

In fact I’ve been enjoying the game so much that I felt compelled to grind back up to legend this month, which is much less brutal than it is in Hearthstone thanks to the Serpent system which acts as a safety net below each rank. When I finally made it to legend, after back to back games in which a top-decked Cliff Racer saved my butt, I felt a great rush of relief and elation. My head also felt hot like a holiday resort on Mercury. God I love card games.

Jarred Walton: Threadripper and Tear

When it comes to pure gaming performance, Intel’s CPUs still hold the top marks in the vast majority of games. For non-gaming purposes, however, AMD’s Ryzen CPUs are closing the gap, and in terms of pure bang for the buck, they’re great processors. That’s why I’m excited to see Ryzen Threadripper in action, and we now have an official price and clockspeeds. The bad news is that the top 16-core/32-thread 1950X model will cost $999, and you can easily build a complete gaming PC for less than that. But the good news is clockspeeds will still top out at 4.0GHz, and you get 16 freaking cores and 60 PCIe lanes. Intel’s equivalently priced CPU is the i9-7900X, which ‘only’ has 10 cores. None of this will really matter for games, at least not anytime soon, but damn if I don’t want to do some video editing on this puppy!

[Source:-Pcgamer]

COMPUTER CLASSES ARE DIVERSIFYING! NOW, ABOUT THOSE JOBS…

HIGH-SCHOOL GIRLS ARE taking more Advanced Placement computer engineering exams than ever before, according to a new report from Code.org and the College Board. In 2017, largely thanks to a new test aimed at expanding the reach of engineering classes, female participation in these AP tests increased at a faster rate than young boys’ participation on the exam in 2017.

For women hoping to have careers in computer engineering, this kind of early training can make all the difference. The field of computer science is growing so fast it outpaces all other occupations in the US. It’s great work if you can get it. In fact, 70 percent of students who take this AP exam say they want to work in computer science. Trouble is, it’s mostly white or Asian men who land these high-paying jobs.

Experts say to change that you’ve got to combat the so-called “pipeline problem,” educating women and people of color so they come out of high school and college with the right degrees to enter the field. Heartening numbers like this report are a good step in the right direction. But they also belie the fact that getting women and people of color into the pipeline is just the beginning. The real challenge is supporting these engineers once they enter the field—and actually hiring them in the first place.

Pipeline

Though the increases reported for women and people of color taking this exam should be celebrated, they are fairly modest gains in the scheme of things. This year, 135 percent more women took the AP Computer Science exam than last year. Much of that growth, however, is because the total number of students who took the AP Computer science exam more than doubled on the whole to 111,262 students—spurred on by a new AP course aiming to broaden the reach of computer science and bring the subject to underprivileged communities in urban and rural areas. Code.org says participation from black and Latino students in the AP exam increased by 170 percent compared to one year ago—though that combines two groups together. it is possible the proportion of black students and of Latino students, taken separately, did not increase faster than the rate of boys who took the AP exam this year.

 

“Seeing these gains among female, black, and Hispanic students is a story of how we can bring opportunity to people who need it the most,” says Hadi Partovi, CEO and cofounder of Code.org.

Ten years ago, only 18 percent of computer science exam takers were women. This year that figure rose to 27 percent—slightly lower than the average proportion of women employed in the tech industry, which hovers at around 30 percent. It’s the same for young people of color: for nearly a decade, the proportion of young POCs who took the AP Computer Science exam stalled at 12 to 13 percent. But in 2016, 15 percent of exam takers were young people of color—then that went up to 20 percent in 2017.

“I’m delighted to hear that more female, black, and Latino students are taking AP computer science,” says Rachel Thomas, a deep learning researcher and advocate for diversity. “I attended a very poor public high school in Texas, but I was incredibly lucky that they were offering AP computer science 17 years ago. My guidance counselor discouraged me from taking the course, and I’m proud of teenage me for standing my ground in wanting to take it,” she says.

The excitement in the new AP course shows that if educators bring computer science to more people a more diverse people will jump into the pool of job candidates. And that will, in turn, help to supply the industry with computer science graduates and address the projected talent shortagefor the tech industry in the years to come.

Workplace Culture Still Needs to Change

The pipeline problem, however, is far from the only thing keeping women and minorities out of engineering. Universities already graduate Latino, black, and female students at a much higher rate than tech companies hire them.

Women leave technology companies at twice the rate of men, according to a survey from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. The trend is similar for people of color in tech. This is a culture problem, not a pipeline one.

“Most major tech companies are revolving doors in which women and people of color quit at similar rates to which they’re hired due to poor treatment, lack of advancement opportunities, and unfairness,” says Thomas. “I think it is a total smoke screen when major tech companies celebrate Code.org’ss while continuing to fail to address their own toxic environments.”

Worse yet, seeing improvements in diversity doesn’t mean the trend will hold. In the 1960s and ’70s, the number of women studying computer science outpaced men. And yet, after the 1984-1985 academic year in which women accounted for nearly 37 percent of all computer science undergraduate students, the percentage flattened out, dropping to 14 percent by 2014.

“Getting women and people of color into the pipeline is one thing,” says Tracy Cross, a professor of educational psychology at The College of William and Mary’s Center for Gifted Education. “But if we aren’t keeping them in the field, that’s not enough.”

A recent slew of sexual harassment stories pouring out of Silicon Valley shows the extremes of how toxic the field can be for women. But there are subtler ways, too, that the Valley can alienate people. “There are many forms of disrespect, devaluing, demeaning, and isolating behavior that occur in these male dominated fields, some of them by good intention, some of them by ill intention, and some of them unintentional,” says Denise Wilson, a professor of engineering who got her tech degree in the late ’80s.

The VC and tech industries have efforts in the works to fix this culture problem, including drafting a decency pledge, a blacklist, and other public promises. With more women and people of color entering the pipeline, tech companies have more candidates to hire—and more candidates they must do right by.

Nokia 2 Budget Android Smartphone Leaked in Image Comparing It With Nokia 3

Nokia 2 Budget Android Smartphone Leaked in Image Comparing It With Nokia 3

HMD Global, the custodian of Nokia mobile brand, has been rumoured to be working on few Android-based smartphones that have been leaked in recent past. Now, a new leaked image from China claims to show the entry-level Nokia 2 Android smartphone being compared alongside the Nokia 3.

The new leaked image has been posted by a tipster on Chinese website, Baidu, and purportedly shows the yet-to-be-announced Nokia 2. The alleged Nokia 2 could be the company’s cheapest offering this year which means that the phone may be priced lower than the Nokia 3, which is the cheapest Android smartphone in HMD Global’s portfolio. It’s worth pointing out that the tipster has allegedly used a schematic of Nokia 3 to compare it alongside the alleged Nokia 2.

The Chinese tipster also claims that the Nokia 2 may be powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 210 MSM8909 processor. Much like the Nokia 3, the alleged Nokia 2 also doesn’t feature a fingerprint scanner. Additionally, the Nokia 2 seems to feature a similar 5-inch display as it looks to match the screen space of the Nokia 3.

Further, the tipster also claims that the budget Nokia 2 may look like now dead Lumia 620. Looking at the leaked image, it gives an impression that the alleged Nokia 2 may sport rounded edges much like the Lumia 620.

Unfortunately, there’s no word on the launch of the Nokia 2 as of now but we can expect to hear more about the phone in the coming weeks. The Baidu listing was first spotted by DroidHolic.

Apart from the entry-level Nokia 2, HMD Global is expected to launch the Nokia 8 as well as the long-rumoured Nokia 9 smartphone later this year.

Recently, the Nokia 8 flagship smartphone was spotted on the official Chinese site hinting at an imminent launch.

 

[“source-gadgets.ndtv”]